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Mauser handgun stocks

 

DaveN
Professional Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 84
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I think it is important to get as much stuff onto these forum topics as possible as soon as possible. We are expecting a bunch of new associate members in the next coupla months. 

Here are some photos of stocking a Mauser m-1896 Broomhandle pistol - This version is called a 'cone hammer' because of the shape of the concentric rings on the hammer. These very early versions have a frame shaped a bit different than the later models, which makes finding correct stocks almost impossible, hence you have to make them.

The first thing to decide is which way is up.

1a

Next, is to divide the blank in such a way as to aline the grain flow to be as matching as possible to match side to side. This is not necessary in most cases ,but it impresses the owner. 

2a

Fitting em up is just about the same as doing long guns. Prussian blue, spot and scrap.

4a

Locating and installing the screw estcusion is next.

 

3a

This one is actually a different gun (notice the temper colors from welding pits), but it is the only photo I have of shaping the grips.

6 (2)

This underside curvy area is the location were the conehammer version is slightly different than the later models.

07 26 2013 07;04;06PMkkk

You may notice that the lanyard ring is now reinstalled. It had been removed to keep it from getting dinged during the stock making. Things like the right number of grooves and the shape of the screw escussion are important to duplicate.

 

7a
7 26 2013 9;32;28 AMvv

Kinda on the same subject , This is a stock duplication for a Mauser pistol-carbine. Since they sell for slightly over $20K it makes doing a good job important. The real issue on this job was getting the shape in and at the pistol grip just right. Having an original stock to copy was important on this job to get that grip area right. 

highres.
P9020003ddf

   
Rob Rowen, Kurtm2323 and Ray reacted
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Professional Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 10
 

Very cool Dave. Restoring wood to original configuration and finish is demanding work when done correctly. Beautiful!


   
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